A Little Irish Lingo to Put in Your Pocket

In the first few weeks that I was in Dublin, I was warned to steer clear of any phrase that included the word “fanny,” given the correct spelling of the Irish equivalent of “idiot,” and toasted a glass of wine with the Gaelic for “cheers.” Irish jargon can catch you off guard initially, but you grow accustomed to it quickly. And it never seems to lose its charm. Below, you’ll find a list of Irish slang and phrasing that you should definitely know before heading to the Emerald Isle.

I Speak (Raspberry) Danish

I was proud of this stupid joke I thought of while standing in a cafe at the Copenhagen train station, eyes wide as they trailed over pink-frosted sweets and shelves piled high with pastries. After ordering a sommerkaffe (mostly milk with a shot of hazelnut flavor and just a splash of coffee that still left my caffeine-sensitive body jittery), my scouring eyes landed on a raspberry danish, whose Danish name I didn’t need to know to point it out and order eagerly. Flaky, surrounding a bright pink

Hamlet's Helsingør at Kronborg Castle

Kronborg (Hamlet’s) Castle was the muse that drove me to Denmark, the Shakespearean work my compass to being too much in the sun. Hamlet is my favorite of the Bard’s plays, and I couldn’t wait to wrap myself up in its blanket of a dual mystical history: the history of Kronborg as Frederick II’s Renaissance masterpiece, and the history of Elsinore as Hamlet’s abode. Helsingør is an forty minute train ride away from Copenhagen, a speedy trip that ventures into the countryside as you travel north.

Three Days in Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis is my first major city to visit in the South, and will certainly not be the last. It is an area of the country and world that I hope to spend more time in, because of how vastly it differs from the northeast (my stomping ground) and how deeply its historical roots run. If I had my druthers, travel there would be any time, save summer. But family vacation this year worked out in being towards the end of the summer, when the weather could have been a lot worse than it was.

Nashville: On Honky Tonk and Jalapeño Margaritas

On arriving in the afternoon, sunshine warming the distinctive AT&T building climbing to the sky, Nashville buzzed with an enviable rhythm. Summer crowds weaning, history soaked into the city’s veins, and predominantly urban vibes excited this city-slicker as we headed out for the evening (after an afternoon swim, of course. Where there’s a pool, there’s a twenty-one-year-old gal practicing her shabby butterfly stroke).

Returning to Dublin: A Visit to my Host City

And though almost two years had passed, it felt more like hours when I arrived at the Dublin Airport. As the late-setting sun sunk into the sky, and the Airlink bus traveled the route I still had memorized, I was overcome with happiness. My semester abroad had touched me deeply, its effects still cradling my heart; and the memories that rushed back as I was driven up Dame Street, around Christ Church Cathedral, finally hopping off at Merchant’s Quay, my old stomping ground.

When in Beerlin...

I have had such a hard time putting my time in Berlin into words. It was four days as multilayered as the city itself, engulfed in history, expats, and affordability. My curiosity about this sprawling metropolis and those lost generation-ers among us who have given Berlin its claim to fame made for the perfect storm of a trip there. Though I wasn’t daring enough to take on their illustrious nightclub scene, I left, for lack of an actual word (see what I mean?), whirlwinded.

Gone to Connemara (in my mind...)

James Taylor knew what he was talking about. Except instead of sunshine and moonshine, I can see the flourishing clouds covering and uncovering the sky and feel the drunken ecstasy. The mountains are one of my favorite things in the entire world, and though Ireland isn’t mountainous, per se, the terrain is rugged and craggy and, of course, green. Strung with valleys that cater off into the distance, and sheep that dot the landscape, it is a storybook fantasy come alive. While in Galway, Sam an

I'm Still Laughing: Thank You, Geraldine DeRuiter

I have a note in my phone that runs three long scrolls down, filled with books I want to read. When it came to Christmas and my birthday, and I couldn’t remember exactly what every book was, I would play Title Roulette and copy and paste random titles into a new Safari page to skim the description. But some books lingered in my unconscious, and felt like love (or at least, infatuation) when I locked eyes with their title. And it was an, “Ah, yes, you. I’ve been waiting for you.”

Walk Around the Clock: A Berlin Walking Tour

One of my dad’s life mantras, absorbed into my own, is “if it’s free, it’s for me!” I know that free doesn’t always mean the best quality, like a free swipe into the dining hall of any given college, but it can be awesome, too. So when I was planning for Berlin, I began researching for free walking tours. I had done one while on a trip to Edinburgh, Scotland, and as that one had proven spectacular, it seemed fitting to try again.

Google Maps: A Story of Losing Yourself And Finding Digestives

One night in October or November of 2017, my best friend Sam was sleeping over and we began talking travel. I was in the hypothetical phase of a trip to Europe in the coming summer to celebrate my graduation from college, and as the thought cropped up we laughingly sighed, “What if we just go to Europe this summer?” Then we looked at each other, a serious glint in our eyes. “What if we just go to Europe this summer?”

Lin Manuel Miranda's March #Hamildrop is Art's Empowerment at Work

Lin Manuel Miranda’s March Hamildrop, a collaboration with Ben Platt/Dear Evan Hansen, was released with perfect timing this morning. It comes just before the March For Our Lives this weekend, and a portion of the proceeds from the song “Found/Tonight” will support the march. And in the light of national crises we have born witness, we’ve been needing this sort of art to carry the fight forward. Like they say in the mash up, “The morning is breaking, and all is new.”

Why Dublin is Perfect for Solo Travelers

Happy spring! It is far from the season here, as we’re expecting more snow today. *face palm* I thought that I would start an Ireland series here, because I am SO excitedly returning to visit my sister, Kaylee, as she is studying abroad in Dublin this semester. We both are now honorary Champlain College students, and both Champlain Dublin alum who are going to join in the program’s 10-year anniversary celebrations in Burlington, VT early this coming June.

Tips for Cycling the Slea Head Drive

I’m an amateur rider at best, having spent a summer learning how to confidently bike from my home in Everett, Massachusetts to downtown Boston in order to feel secure in cycling through Dublin for four months. When I arrived, the left lane driving and bike paths that wound in and around traffic shattered any stitch of self-assurance I’d previously had, and settled on renting bikes here and there. But I am a fervent lover of the mode, and it is probably my favorite way to see the world.

Strudel and Salzburger Nockerl: Cooking in Austria

I love to travel, and I love to bake, and when those worlds collide is when my own world feels balanced. While in Salzburg, Austria over the summer, my friend Sam and I took a class in making apple strudel, a renowned Austrian treat that might clash with visions of wiener schnitzel, and isn’t the famed sachertorte, but is important to the fabric of the country’s cuisine. The Edelweiss Cooking School is housed in a cavernous chamber, set in the Mönchsberg Mountain just outside of the Old Town. T
Load More Articles